Iraq Increases Oil Export Capacity

By John Lee.

Oil Minister Jabar Ali al-Luaibi [Allibi, Luiebi] (pictured) has said that oil export capacity at Iraq’s southern ports has increased to 4.6 million barrels per day (bpd), following the completion of its fifth single floating terminal.

The new terminal has a capacity of 900,000 bpd.

The Minister said Iraq will continue to expand its production and export capacity.

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

Oil Ministry Declares its Final Exports for September

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Ministry of Oil has announced final oil exports for September of 97.2 million barrels, giving an average for the month of 3.240 million barrels per day (bpd), slightly more than the 3.216 bpd exported in August.

These exports were shipped by 38 multinational companies from the ports of Basra, Khor Al- Omaia and the SPM’s on the Arab Gulf, with no exports registered from Kirkuk.

Revenues for the month were $4.866 billion, at an average price of $50.062 per barrel.

August export figures are available here.

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

Oil Ministry Declares its Final Exports for September

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Ministry of Oil has announced final oil exports for September of 97.2 million barrels, giving an average for the month of 3.240 million barrels per day (bpd), slightly more than the 3.216 bpd exported in August.

These exports were shipped by 38 multinational companies from the ports of Basra, Khor Al- Omaia and the SPM’s on the Arab Gulf, with no exports registered from Kirkuk.

Revenues for the month were $4.866 billion, at an average price of $50.062 per barrel.

August export figures are available here.

(Source: Ministry of Oil)

Iran Bans Oil Products Shipment to Iraqi Kurdistan

Iran’s Ministry of Roads and Urban Development warned companies against shipment of oil products to and from the Iraqi Kurdistan “until further notice”.

The decision is in line with Tehran’s series of measures in response to a referendum held in the semi-autonomous region on possible secession from Iraq which has drawn international criticism.

“Given the recent developments in the region, it is suitable that international transportation companies and drivers active in this field avoid loading and carrying oil products to and from the Iraqi Kurdistan Region until further notice,” a directive by the ministry’s Road Maintenance and Transportation Organization said.

“It should be noted that the consequences of any action in this regard would befall the relevant company,” it added.

The transportation is mostly carried out by tanker trucks which take crude oil from the Iraqi Kurdistan to Iran and carry back refined products to the region.

The Iraqi Kurdistan Region went ahead with its plan to hold the referendum on Monday while Iraq’s neighbors and countries in the Middle East, including Iran and Turkey, had voiced opposition to such a move and supported the Baghdad central government.

On Monday night, thousands of Kurdish people in favor of KRG’s secession from Iraq took to the streets in Erbil, with some waving Israeli flags to celebrate.

No one in the region, except Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, endorsed the referendum, and all neighbors have warned that the secession plan would bring instability to the region and disintegrate Iraq.

Pressure has been building on officials in Erbil, Kurdistan’s regional capital, over the referendum, with regional carriers, including Turkish Airlines, Egypt Air and Lebanon’s Middle East Airlines submitting to Baghdad’s request to suspend their flights serving Iraqi Kurdistan.

(Source: Tasnim, under Creative Commons licence)

Iraq seeks to collect KRG’s Oil Revenues

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has hinted that his government wants to take control of revenue generated from Kurdish oil exports.

The measure is the latest of a set of actions taken by Baghdad against the Kurdistan Region for carrying out last week’s referendum that saw a 92-percent vote for independence, the first of which saw a ban in international flights to and from the Kurdish region.

Abadi said in a tweet that his government wanted to pay monthly salaries of KRG employees with money from Kurdish oil sales.  “Federal government control of oil revenues is in order to pay KR (Kurdistan Region) employee salaries in full and so that money will not go to the corrupt,” Abadi tweeted.

The Kurdistan Region has described the Iraqi-imposed flight ban, and other measures as “collective punishment,” that, among others, affect the wounded Kurdish Peshmerga who need medical treatment abroad, and Yezidi survivors of IS atrocities.

Amanj Rahim, the secretary of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), told the Kurdish parliament on September 30 that the oil export through Turkey’s Ceyhan pipeline was going ahead as normal.

Separately, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi reassured Kurdish citizens they will remain secure even as the government escalates its measure against their region’s government over the recent referendum on independence.

You are citizens of the first degree, we will not allow any harm to you and we will share our loaf of bread together,” Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said, addressing Kurds via twitter on September 30. “To our people in the Kurdistan region: We defend our Kurdish citizens as we defend all Iraqis and will not allow any attack on them,” Abadi added.

(Source: GardaWorld)

Oil Exports Up Slightly in September

By John Lee.

Iraq’s Ministry of Oil has announced preliminary oil exports for September of 97,204,267 barrels, giving an average for the month of 3.240 million barrels per day (bpd), slightly more than the 3.216 bpd exported in August.

The exports were entirely from the southern terminals, with no exports from Kirkuk via Ceyhan.

Revenues for the month were $4.882 billion at an average price of $50.225 per barrel.

August export figures can be found here.

(Source: Ministry of Oil)